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Uranium Erin

Page history last edited by Erin P 7 years, 1 month ago

                                                           DIG THAT URANIUM

 

 

This is an example of an explosion.                This is just a fun video from a movie called 'Dig That Uranium'. 
     Using Uranium and Plutonium.                                   It is a song all about Uranium.            

                                                                        

 

  URANIUM                  

  • Canada used to be the largest producer of Uranium but in 2009 Kazakhstan became the new number 1 producer.
 
  • Most of the Uranium mines in Canada are located in Northern Saskatchewan. Whixh is the largest mine area.
 
  • In 1942, exploration began for military purposes.
 
  • The main producers of Uranium are Cameco and Areva Resouces Canada.
 
  • The government fully supports Uranium mining.
 

  Uranium in What 

 

  • It is in yellow glasses and pottery glazes
 
  • Also in bathroom tiles as well as kitchen tiles
 
  • Photographic chemicals in lamp filaments 
 
  • Oddly enough it is in dentures

 

  • In the 1890's, Uranium was used to make yellow dye that everyone wanted in order to make fashionable garments 

 

          More Harmful Uses

  • It is used for nuclear power plants
 
  • Also used in nuclear weapons
 
  • Mostly used by the military 
 
  • To protect army tanks
 
  • Finally it's in parts of bullets and missiles
 

 

 

  What's so HARMFUL about Uranium

  • Chemical toxicity
 
  • It's Radioactive
 
  • Being exposed to Uranium increases your chances of getting all different kinds of cancers due to its radioactivity
 
  • Uranium vapor and dust are highly toxic

 

 

     Characteristics

  •  Dense
  • Silvery - White
  • Ductile
  • Radioactive metal
  • Slightly paramegnetic
  • Dissolves in acids
  • Insoluble in alkalis
  • Dark layer of oxide
  • Malleable

 

     Mines 

 

These are just a few of many other Uranium mines in Canada:
                                                                                                     This is an Uranium Mine  
                                                                                                      Cameco McArthur River                                                                                                                                

Mines 

Province 

Operation

Tonnes U 

Tonnes U3O8d 

Percentages  

Average Ore Grade 

Cigar Lake 
SSK 
Cameco 
83,560 
98,540 
18.30% 
Proven and Proable Resources 
Millennium 
SSK 
Cameco 
19,590 
23,100 
4.55% 
Indicated Resources 
Shea Creek 
SSK 
Areva - UEX 
24,600 
29,000 
1.54% 
Indicated Resources 
Roughrider 
SSK 
Harthor 
22,300 
26,300 
2.0 - 11.6% 
Indicated and Inferred Resources 
Kiggavik 
Nunavut 
Areva 
49,153 
57,966 
0.22% 
Inferred Resources 
Michelin 
Labradour 
Aurora 
26,000 
30,600 
0.11% 
Measured and Indicated Resources 
Matoush 
Quebec 
Strateco 
6680 
7875
0.45% 
Inferred Resources 

 

 

     Things About Uranium

 

  • Uranium has the largest atoms of any naturally occuring element of earth

 

  • In 1937 Enrico Fermi, a physicist, discovered that bombarding uranium with tiny particles called neutrons made the uranium atoms to split into smaller atoms called fission products. 
 
  • When uranium atoms absorb a neutron it splits or fissions. It gives off neutrons and two other atoms that are much smaller called fission products.  

 

  • If uranium is handled properly it is of no danger to others
 
  • Some atoms that have been left after Uranium splits, can be very radioactive, and they could possibly stay radioactive for thousands and thousands of years
 
  • Uranium fuel is formed into tiny pellets and then placed in fuel rods. Fuel Rods: in a nuclear reactor, a device which contains pellets of uranium fuel
 
  • The main source of Uranium was an ore called pitchblende. It became even more radioactive than just plain old pure Uranium. Inisde there was Uranium, Polonium and Radium
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

        

 

          Uranium

 

 

Uranium bibliography.docx  

 

 

 

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